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Andromeda1023: Amateur astronomer, nurse; love music, bellydance/dance; married.

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sagansense:

As mentioned in earlier posts, we - Melissa Coloma (Communications; lawngirl), David Ruck (Director/Filmmaker/Producer), and myself (Public Relations/Social Media) - were invited and brought to EAA AirVenture (#OSH14) in Oshkosh, WI from July 27-30 on behalf of ATK Aerospace Group for multiple screenings of our film "I want to be an Astronaut” through August 2 at the SkyScape theater inside the EAA AirVenture Museum.
The above pictures feature David Ruck accompanied by Charlie Precourt (Former Astronaut/Current VP of ATK), Joe Engle (Former Astronaut/X-15 Test Pilot) and David Hartman (ABC’s ‘Good Morning America’, History Channel, PBS, Media Host, Journalist, Actor) who spoke on a panel/Q&A after our main screening of the week at EAA AirVenture’s ‘Theater in the Woods’ venue.
Along with the inspiration behind the film, his personal process as a filmmaker, and the importance of the narrative, David explained that the public’s perception of NASA is skewed regarding its relevance to our culture/society. NASA doesn’t do everything “in house” so to speak…it’s a combination of industry partners spread over 400+ towns all over the nation, whereby an average person who feels as if they are incredibly distant from the space program could contribute greatly simply by being a welder or mechanical engineer. There may be a company in your home town which manufactures a specific sealing technique or rivet that serves to the overall process to complete a spacecraft or fabricate its essential systems.
NASA is alive and well, we assure you. Our goal, however, is to communicate the efforts made by tens of thousands of every day men and women who contribute to the entity that is NASA. This is a space program paid for by the American people, which currently receives .4% of a penny on a tax dollar. It’s shameful and truly embarrassing that the elected leaders of this country repeatedly neglect NASA’s importance not just to the nation, but the world at large.
Others around the world still revel in awe at the triumphs of this space program, wondering when we will witness the excitement and bold missions which embodied exploration through the human space flight effort. We intend to take this film and its message, (along with our ability to communicate it it further) around the country to schools/universities, science centers, planetariums, museums, festivals, indoor/outdoor theaters in order to impart a sense of responsibility and backsliding as individuals who have had the power to vote with their words, actions, and tax dollars for the past 57 years.
Our mission is clear:
“To tell the story of going…and remind everyone what NASA means to the world, reignite those dreams again, and explore space together.”— David Ruck & Rich Evans

We must not stop dreaming. We all want to go, so let’s go.
ZoomInfo
sagansense:

As mentioned in earlier posts, we - Melissa Coloma (Communications; lawngirl), David Ruck (Director/Filmmaker/Producer), and myself (Public Relations/Social Media) - were invited and brought to EAA AirVenture (#OSH14) in Oshkosh, WI from July 27-30 on behalf of ATK Aerospace Group for multiple screenings of our film "I want to be an Astronaut” through August 2 at the SkyScape theater inside the EAA AirVenture Museum.
The above pictures feature David Ruck accompanied by Charlie Precourt (Former Astronaut/Current VP of ATK), Joe Engle (Former Astronaut/X-15 Test Pilot) and David Hartman (ABC’s ‘Good Morning America’, History Channel, PBS, Media Host, Journalist, Actor) who spoke on a panel/Q&A after our main screening of the week at EAA AirVenture’s ‘Theater in the Woods’ venue.
Along with the inspiration behind the film, his personal process as a filmmaker, and the importance of the narrative, David explained that the public’s perception of NASA is skewed regarding its relevance to our culture/society. NASA doesn’t do everything “in house” so to speak…it’s a combination of industry partners spread over 400+ towns all over the nation, whereby an average person who feels as if they are incredibly distant from the space program could contribute greatly simply by being a welder or mechanical engineer. There may be a company in your home town which manufactures a specific sealing technique or rivet that serves to the overall process to complete a spacecraft or fabricate its essential systems.
NASA is alive and well, we assure you. Our goal, however, is to communicate the efforts made by tens of thousands of every day men and women who contribute to the entity that is NASA. This is a space program paid for by the American people, which currently receives .4% of a penny on a tax dollar. It’s shameful and truly embarrassing that the elected leaders of this country repeatedly neglect NASA’s importance not just to the nation, but the world at large.
Others around the world still revel in awe at the triumphs of this space program, wondering when we will witness the excitement and bold missions which embodied exploration through the human space flight effort. We intend to take this film and its message, (along with our ability to communicate it it further) around the country to schools/universities, science centers, planetariums, museums, festivals, indoor/outdoor theaters in order to impart a sense of responsibility and backsliding as individuals who have had the power to vote with their words, actions, and tax dollars for the past 57 years.
Our mission is clear:
“To tell the story of going…and remind everyone what NASA means to the world, reignite those dreams again, and explore space together.”— David Ruck & Rich Evans

We must not stop dreaming. We all want to go, so let’s go.
ZoomInfo
sagansense:

As mentioned in earlier posts, we - Melissa Coloma (Communications; lawngirl), David Ruck (Director/Filmmaker/Producer), and myself (Public Relations/Social Media) - were invited and brought to EAA AirVenture (#OSH14) in Oshkosh, WI from July 27-30 on behalf of ATK Aerospace Group for multiple screenings of our film "I want to be an Astronaut” through August 2 at the SkyScape theater inside the EAA AirVenture Museum.
The above pictures feature David Ruck accompanied by Charlie Precourt (Former Astronaut/Current VP of ATK), Joe Engle (Former Astronaut/X-15 Test Pilot) and David Hartman (ABC’s ‘Good Morning America’, History Channel, PBS, Media Host, Journalist, Actor) who spoke on a panel/Q&A after our main screening of the week at EAA AirVenture’s ‘Theater in the Woods’ venue.
Along with the inspiration behind the film, his personal process as a filmmaker, and the importance of the narrative, David explained that the public’s perception of NASA is skewed regarding its relevance to our culture/society. NASA doesn’t do everything “in house” so to speak…it’s a combination of industry partners spread over 400+ towns all over the nation, whereby an average person who feels as if they are incredibly distant from the space program could contribute greatly simply by being a welder or mechanical engineer. There may be a company in your home town which manufactures a specific sealing technique or rivet that serves to the overall process to complete a spacecraft or fabricate its essential systems.
NASA is alive and well, we assure you. Our goal, however, is to communicate the efforts made by tens of thousands of every day men and women who contribute to the entity that is NASA. This is a space program paid for by the American people, which currently receives .4% of a penny on a tax dollar. It’s shameful and truly embarrassing that the elected leaders of this country repeatedly neglect NASA’s importance not just to the nation, but the world at large.
Others around the world still revel in awe at the triumphs of this space program, wondering when we will witness the excitement and bold missions which embodied exploration through the human space flight effort. We intend to take this film and its message, (along with our ability to communicate it it further) around the country to schools/universities, science centers, planetariums, museums, festivals, indoor/outdoor theaters in order to impart a sense of responsibility and backsliding as individuals who have had the power to vote with their words, actions, and tax dollars for the past 57 years.
Our mission is clear:
“To tell the story of going…and remind everyone what NASA means to the world, reignite those dreams again, and explore space together.”— David Ruck & Rich Evans

We must not stop dreaming. We all want to go, so let’s go.
ZoomInfo
sagansense:

As mentioned in earlier posts, we - Melissa Coloma (Communications; lawngirl), David Ruck (Director/Filmmaker/Producer), and myself (Public Relations/Social Media) - were invited and brought to EAA AirVenture (#OSH14) in Oshkosh, WI from July 27-30 on behalf of ATK Aerospace Group for multiple screenings of our film "I want to be an Astronaut” through August 2 at the SkyScape theater inside the EAA AirVenture Museum.
The above pictures feature David Ruck accompanied by Charlie Precourt (Former Astronaut/Current VP of ATK), Joe Engle (Former Astronaut/X-15 Test Pilot) and David Hartman (ABC’s ‘Good Morning America’, History Channel, PBS, Media Host, Journalist, Actor) who spoke on a panel/Q&A after our main screening of the week at EAA AirVenture’s ‘Theater in the Woods’ venue.
Along with the inspiration behind the film, his personal process as a filmmaker, and the importance of the narrative, David explained that the public’s perception of NASA is skewed regarding its relevance to our culture/society. NASA doesn’t do everything “in house” so to speak…it’s a combination of industry partners spread over 400+ towns all over the nation, whereby an average person who feels as if they are incredibly distant from the space program could contribute greatly simply by being a welder or mechanical engineer. There may be a company in your home town which manufactures a specific sealing technique or rivet that serves to the overall process to complete a spacecraft or fabricate its essential systems.
NASA is alive and well, we assure you. Our goal, however, is to communicate the efforts made by tens of thousands of every day men and women who contribute to the entity that is NASA. This is a space program paid for by the American people, which currently receives .4% of a penny on a tax dollar. It’s shameful and truly embarrassing that the elected leaders of this country repeatedly neglect NASA’s importance not just to the nation, but the world at large.
Others around the world still revel in awe at the triumphs of this space program, wondering when we will witness the excitement and bold missions which embodied exploration through the human space flight effort. We intend to take this film and its message, (along with our ability to communicate it it further) around the country to schools/universities, science centers, planetariums, museums, festivals, indoor/outdoor theaters in order to impart a sense of responsibility and backsliding as individuals who have had the power to vote with their words, actions, and tax dollars for the past 57 years.
Our mission is clear:
“To tell the story of going…and remind everyone what NASA means to the world, reignite those dreams again, and explore space together.”— David Ruck & Rich Evans

We must not stop dreaming. We all want to go, so let’s go.
ZoomInfo
sagansense:

As mentioned in earlier posts, we - Melissa Coloma (Communications; lawngirl), David Ruck (Director/Filmmaker/Producer), and myself (Public Relations/Social Media) - were invited and brought to EAA AirVenture (#OSH14) in Oshkosh, WI from July 27-30 on behalf of ATK Aerospace Group for multiple screenings of our film "I want to be an Astronaut” through August 2 at the SkyScape theater inside the EAA AirVenture Museum.
The above pictures feature David Ruck accompanied by Charlie Precourt (Former Astronaut/Current VP of ATK), Joe Engle (Former Astronaut/X-15 Test Pilot) and David Hartman (ABC’s ‘Good Morning America’, History Channel, PBS, Media Host, Journalist, Actor) who spoke on a panel/Q&A after our main screening of the week at EAA AirVenture’s ‘Theater in the Woods’ venue.
Along with the inspiration behind the film, his personal process as a filmmaker, and the importance of the narrative, David explained that the public’s perception of NASA is skewed regarding its relevance to our culture/society. NASA doesn’t do everything “in house” so to speak…it’s a combination of industry partners spread over 400+ towns all over the nation, whereby an average person who feels as if they are incredibly distant from the space program could contribute greatly simply by being a welder or mechanical engineer. There may be a company in your home town which manufactures a specific sealing technique or rivet that serves to the overall process to complete a spacecraft or fabricate its essential systems.
NASA is alive and well, we assure you. Our goal, however, is to communicate the efforts made by tens of thousands of every day men and women who contribute to the entity that is NASA. This is a space program paid for by the American people, which currently receives .4% of a penny on a tax dollar. It’s shameful and truly embarrassing that the elected leaders of this country repeatedly neglect NASA’s importance not just to the nation, but the world at large.
Others around the world still revel in awe at the triumphs of this space program, wondering when we will witness the excitement and bold missions which embodied exploration through the human space flight effort. We intend to take this film and its message, (along with our ability to communicate it it further) around the country to schools/universities, science centers, planetariums, museums, festivals, indoor/outdoor theaters in order to impart a sense of responsibility and backsliding as individuals who have had the power to vote with their words, actions, and tax dollars for the past 57 years.
Our mission is clear:
“To tell the story of going…and remind everyone what NASA means to the world, reignite those dreams again, and explore space together.”— David Ruck & Rich Evans

We must not stop dreaming. We all want to go, so let’s go.
ZoomInfo
sagansense:

As mentioned in earlier posts, we - Melissa Coloma (Communications; lawngirl), David Ruck (Director/Filmmaker/Producer), and myself (Public Relations/Social Media) - were invited and brought to EAA AirVenture (#OSH14) in Oshkosh, WI from July 27-30 on behalf of ATK Aerospace Group for multiple screenings of our film "I want to be an Astronaut” through August 2 at the SkyScape theater inside the EAA AirVenture Museum.
The above pictures feature David Ruck accompanied by Charlie Precourt (Former Astronaut/Current VP of ATK), Joe Engle (Former Astronaut/X-15 Test Pilot) and David Hartman (ABC’s ‘Good Morning America’, History Channel, PBS, Media Host, Journalist, Actor) who spoke on a panel/Q&A after our main screening of the week at EAA AirVenture’s ‘Theater in the Woods’ venue.
Along with the inspiration behind the film, his personal process as a filmmaker, and the importance of the narrative, David explained that the public’s perception of NASA is skewed regarding its relevance to our culture/society. NASA doesn’t do everything “in house” so to speak…it’s a combination of industry partners spread over 400+ towns all over the nation, whereby an average person who feels as if they are incredibly distant from the space program could contribute greatly simply by being a welder or mechanical engineer. There may be a company in your home town which manufactures a specific sealing technique or rivet that serves to the overall process to complete a spacecraft or fabricate its essential systems.
NASA is alive and well, we assure you. Our goal, however, is to communicate the efforts made by tens of thousands of every day men and women who contribute to the entity that is NASA. This is a space program paid for by the American people, which currently receives .4% of a penny on a tax dollar. It’s shameful and truly embarrassing that the elected leaders of this country repeatedly neglect NASA’s importance not just to the nation, but the world at large.
Others around the world still revel in awe at the triumphs of this space program, wondering when we will witness the excitement and bold missions which embodied exploration through the human space flight effort. We intend to take this film and its message, (along with our ability to communicate it it further) around the country to schools/universities, science centers, planetariums, museums, festivals, indoor/outdoor theaters in order to impart a sense of responsibility and backsliding as individuals who have had the power to vote with their words, actions, and tax dollars for the past 57 years.
Our mission is clear:
“To tell the story of going…and remind everyone what NASA means to the world, reignite those dreams again, and explore space together.”— David Ruck & Rich Evans

We must not stop dreaming. We all want to go, so let’s go.
ZoomInfo
sagansense:

As mentioned in earlier posts, we - Melissa Coloma (Communications; lawngirl), David Ruck (Director/Filmmaker/Producer), and myself (Public Relations/Social Media) - were invited and brought to EAA AirVenture (#OSH14) in Oshkosh, WI from July 27-30 on behalf of ATK Aerospace Group for multiple screenings of our film "I want to be an Astronaut” through August 2 at the SkyScape theater inside the EAA AirVenture Museum.
The above pictures feature David Ruck accompanied by Charlie Precourt (Former Astronaut/Current VP of ATK), Joe Engle (Former Astronaut/X-15 Test Pilot) and David Hartman (ABC’s ‘Good Morning America’, History Channel, PBS, Media Host, Journalist, Actor) who spoke on a panel/Q&A after our main screening of the week at EAA AirVenture’s ‘Theater in the Woods’ venue.
Along with the inspiration behind the film, his personal process as a filmmaker, and the importance of the narrative, David explained that the public’s perception of NASA is skewed regarding its relevance to our culture/society. NASA doesn’t do everything “in house” so to speak…it’s a combination of industry partners spread over 400+ towns all over the nation, whereby an average person who feels as if they are incredibly distant from the space program could contribute greatly simply by being a welder or mechanical engineer. There may be a company in your home town which manufactures a specific sealing technique or rivet that serves to the overall process to complete a spacecraft or fabricate its essential systems.
NASA is alive and well, we assure you. Our goal, however, is to communicate the efforts made by tens of thousands of every day men and women who contribute to the entity that is NASA. This is a space program paid for by the American people, which currently receives .4% of a penny on a tax dollar. It’s shameful and truly embarrassing that the elected leaders of this country repeatedly neglect NASA’s importance not just to the nation, but the world at large.
Others around the world still revel in awe at the triumphs of this space program, wondering when we will witness the excitement and bold missions which embodied exploration through the human space flight effort. We intend to take this film and its message, (along with our ability to communicate it it further) around the country to schools/universities, science centers, planetariums, museums, festivals, indoor/outdoor theaters in order to impart a sense of responsibility and backsliding as individuals who have had the power to vote with their words, actions, and tax dollars for the past 57 years.
Our mission is clear:
“To tell the story of going…and remind everyone what NASA means to the world, reignite those dreams again, and explore space together.”— David Ruck & Rich Evans

We must not stop dreaming. We all want to go, so let’s go.
ZoomInfo

sagansense:

As mentioned in earlier posts, we - Melissa Coloma (Communications; lawngirl), David Ruck (Director/Filmmaker/Producer), and myself (Public Relations/Social Media) - were invited and brought to EAA AirVenture (#OSH14) in Oshkosh, WI from July 27-30 on behalf of ATK Aerospace Group for multiple screenings of our film "I want to be an Astronaut through August 2 at the SkyScape theater inside the EAA AirVenture Museum.

The above pictures feature David Ruck accompanied by Charlie Precourt (Former Astronaut/Current VP of ATK), Joe Engle (Former Astronaut/X-15 Test Pilot) and David Hartman (ABC’s ‘Good Morning America’, History Channel, PBS, Media Host, Journalist, Actor) who spoke on a panel/Q&A after our main screening of the week at EAA AirVenture’s ‘Theater in the Woods’ venue.

Along with the inspiration behind the film, his personal process as a filmmaker, and the importance of the narrative, David explained that the public’s perception of NASA is skewed regarding its relevance to our culture/society. NASA doesn’t do everything “in house” so to speak…it’s a combination of industry partners spread over 400+ towns all over the nation, whereby an average person who feels as if they are incredibly distant from the space program could contribute greatly simply by being a welder or mechanical engineer. There may be a company in your home town which manufactures a specific sealing technique or rivet that serves to the overall process to complete a spacecraft or fabricate its essential systems.

NASA is alive and well, we assure you. Our goal, however, is to communicate the efforts made by tens of thousands of every day men and women who contribute to the entity that is NASA. This is a space program paid for by the American people, which currently receives .4% of a penny on a tax dollar. It’s shameful and truly embarrassing that the elected leaders of this country repeatedly neglect NASA’s importance not just to the nation, but the world at large.

Others around the world still revel in awe at the triumphs of this space program, wondering when we will witness the excitement and bold missions which embodied exploration through the human space flight effort. We intend to take this film and its message, (along with our ability to communicate it it further) around the country to schools/universities, science centers, planetariums, museums, festivals, indoor/outdoor theaters in order to impart a sense of responsibility and backsliding as individuals who have had the power to vote with their words, actions, and tax dollars for the past 57 years.

Our mission is clear:

To tell the story of going…and remind everyone what NASA means to the world, reignite those dreams again, and explore space together.
— David Ruck & Rich Evans

image

We must not stop dreaming. We all want to go, so let’s go.

(via meteorologistaustenlonek)

brightestofcentaurus:

Sharpless 171
Sharpless 171 is an emission nebula and star forming region located about 3,000 light years away towards the constellation Cepheus. This view of the region is about 20 light years across and includes part of Cederblad 214, an active region part of Sharpless 171.
Also included in the region is NGC 7822 and Berkely 59, a young star cluster. This cluster emits radiation that erodes surrounding dust and gas, creating the transient shapes of the nebula’s material. The radiation also ionizes hydrogen atoms, stripping away electrons which emit red light upon recombining.
Image from NASA, information from NASA.

brightestofcentaurus:

Sharpless 171

Sharpless 171 is an emission nebula and star forming region located about 3,000 light years away towards the constellation Cepheus. This view of the region is about 20 light years across and includes part of Cederblad 214, an active region part of Sharpless 171.

Also included in the region is NGC 7822 and Berkely 59, a young star cluster. This cluster emits radiation that erodes surrounding dust and gas, creating the transient shapes of the nebula’s material. The radiation also ionizes hydrogen atoms, stripping away electrons which emit red light upon recombining.

Image from NASA, information from NASA.

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