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Andromeda1023: Amateur astronomer, nurse; love music, bellydance/dance; married.

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goverload:

Blood Moon 2014 by SeanParker: “Blood Moon”

Tonight’s Lunar Eclipse was an unforgettable experience for me! It was such a great sight to see. Here is a 8-photo panoramic taken through a 12” LX Meade 200 telescope with a Canon 6D in Tucson, AZ. I will be posting more photos tomorrow. Sharing is appreciated!

http://on.fb.me/1l45OBEwww.sean-parker.com





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goverload:

Blood Moon 2014 by SeanParker: “Blood Moon”

Tonight’s Lunar Eclipse was an unforgettable experience for me! It was such a great sight to see. Here is a 8-photo panoramic taken through a 12” LX Meade 200 telescope with a Canon 6D in Tucson, AZ. I will be posting more photos tomorrow. Sharing is appreciated!

http://on.fb.me/1l45OBE
www.sean-parker.com

(via TumbleOn)
just—space:

Milky Way and Meteors over the Geysers of Yellowstone [780x1170] by David Lane





(via TumbleOn)
Camera

Canon EOS 5D Mark II

ISO

3200

Aperture

Exposure

120"

Focal Length

50mm

just—space:

Milky Way and Meteors over the Geysers of Yellowstone [780x1170] by David Lane

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astronomicalwonders:

A Cluster of New Stars - NGC 7129
A cluster of newborn stars herald their birth in this picture obtained with NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope. These bright young stars are found in a rosebud-shaped nebulosity known as NGC 7129. The star cluster and its associated nebula are located at a distance of 3300 light-years away in the constellation Cepheus.
A recent census of the cluster reveals the presence of 130 young stars. The stars formed from a massive cloud of gas and dust that contains enough raw materials to create a thousand Sun-like stars. In a process that astronomers still poorly understand, fragments of this molecular cloud became so cold and dense that they collapsed into stars. Most stars in our Milky Way galaxy are thought to form in such clusters.
Credit: NASA/JPL





(via TumbleOn)

astronomicalwonders:

A Cluster of New Stars - NGC 7129

A cluster of newborn stars herald their birth in this picture obtained with NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope. These bright young stars are found in a rosebud-shaped nebulosity known as NGC 7129. The star cluster and its associated nebula are located at a distance of 3300 light-years away in the constellation Cepheus.

A recent census of the cluster reveals the presence of 130 young stars. The stars formed from a massive cloud of gas and dust that contains enough raw materials to create a thousand Sun-like stars. In a process that astronomers still poorly understand, fragments of this molecular cloud became so cold and dense that they collapsed into stars. Most stars in our Milky Way galaxy are thought to form in such clusters.

Credit: NASA/JPL

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astrodidact:

Spica, Mars, and Eclipsed Moon (2014 Apr 16) Explanation: A beautiful, reddened Moon slid through dark skies on April 15, completely immersed in Earth’s shadow for well over an hour. It was the year’s first total lunar eclipse and was widely enjoyed over the planet’s Western Hemisphere. Seen from the Caribbean island of Barbados, the dimmed lunar disk is captured during totality in this colorful skyview. The dark Moon’s red color contrasts nicely with bright bluish star Spica, alpha star of the constellation Virgo, posing only about two degrees away. Brighter than Spica and about 10 degrees from the Moon on the right, Mars is near opposition and closest approach to Earth. The Red Planet’s own ruddy hue seems to echo the color of the eclipsed Moon. 
Image Credit & Copyright: Damian Peach http://www.damianpeach.com/ 
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap140416.html 





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astrodidact:

Spica, Mars, and Eclipsed Moon (2014 Apr 16) 

Explanation: A beautiful, reddened Moon slid through dark skies on April 15, completely immersed in Earth’s shadow for well over an hour. It was the year’s first total lunar eclipse and was widely enjoyed over the planet’s Western Hemisphere. Seen from the Caribbean island of Barbados, the dimmed lunar disk is captured during totality in this colorful skyview. The dark Moon’s red color contrasts nicely with bright bluish star Spica, alpha star of the constellation Virgo, posing only about two degrees away. Brighter than Spica and about 10 degrees from the Moon on the right, Mars is near opposition and closest approach to Earth. The Red Planet’s own ruddy hue seems to echo the color of the eclipsed Moon. 


Image Credit & Copyright: Damian Peach 
http://www.damianpeach.com/ 

http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap140416.html 

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livefromearth:

Tonight’s a great night to look up. Starting at 2AM EDT and peaking from 3am to 4:30, there will be a lunar eclipse visible from all of North America. To make things better, Mars is currently very close to Earth, making it the brightest object in the night sky. 

If you’re lucky enough to be viewing tonight’s events from Central Florida, Space-X will be launching a Dragon 9 capsule to the ISS at 4:58PM EDT - adding a little extra something to the sky.

See you in the stars.





(via TumbleOn)

livefromearth:

Tonight’s a great night to look up. Starting at 2AM EDT and peaking from 3am to 4:30, there will be a lunar eclipse visible from all of North America. To make things better, Mars is currently very close to Earth, making it the brightest object in the night sky.

If you’re lucky enough to be viewing tonight’s events from Central Florida, Space-X will be launching a Dragon 9 capsule to the ISS at 4:58PM EDT - adding a little extra something to the sky.

See you in the stars.

(via TumbleOn)
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